Where to Find Us
We are conveniently located in the   College Park Shopping Center on Auburn Drive just off South Military Highway. Visit us in
Virginia Beach or Norfolk, Virgina during our regular office hours to speak with one of our specialists.
 


Hours of Operation:
Monday – Thursday
9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
1 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Additional Appointments Available on Friday, Saturday and Evenings 


  
Links:
Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation

American Diabetes Association™ 

American Podiatric Medical Association
 

Children & Sports - Footwear


You're On Specialties --> Foot Disorders --> Injuries & Trauma --> Children & Sports --> Footwear
 
Children & Sports       
Training Emphasis  Footwear   • Growing Bones & Ligaments   Injuries & Treatments 
       
Foot & Ankle Injuries       
• Injury Myths  Injury Prevention  Before Seeing a Podiatrist   

 

Footwear
 
Whether parents like it or not, part of a child's image revolves around footwear. Expensive sneakers have become fashion statements as much as athletic equipment. But for good foot health, the condition of the shoe is more important than the price tag or brand name.
 
Podiatric physicians agree it's often better to buy a child two $50 pairs of shoes than a single $100 pair, so the shoes can be rotated to avoid rapid wear deterioration. Excessive wearing of the outsole, loss of shoe counter support, or wearing out in the midsole indicate it's time to replace the shoes.
 
Because a child's feet are constantly growing, it is important to allow at least one finger's width from the end of the longest toe when buying shoes. Remember, proper fit is very important. You can have the best shoe in the world, but if it doesn't fit right, it doesn't do its job.
In the shoe store, children should put on both shoes, with their athletic socks and the laces tied tight, for several minutes to properly check the shoes' fit. Shop for shoes in the afternoon, when the feet are naturally slightly swollen.
 
In young children, an "all purpose" sports shoe works well for most sports. A running-specific shoe is not suitable as an all purpose shoe; moving laterally in a running shoe is more difficult and presents greater risk of injury for children. After the age of 10, sport-specific shoes can help improve performance and protect the feet. With the exception of the running shoe, a degree of crossover between sporting shoes is usually not harmful to the feet of a child athlete.
  
Rubber cleats are not usually necessary for children under 10, though they pose little potential harm for them. They are most useful on a soft-field sport such as soccer. Podiatric physicians recommend molded shoe rubber cleats rather than the screw-on variety. Metal baseball spikes can be dangerous and should not be used until the teenage years. 
 
 Copyright 2008, American Podiatric Medical Association, Inc.

 

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