Where to Find Us
We are conveniently located in the   College Park Shopping Center on Auburn Drive just off South Military Highway. Visit us in
Virginia Beach or Norfolk, Virgina during our regular office hours to speak with one of our specialists.
 


 

Hours of Operation:
Monday – Thursday
9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
1 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Additional Appointments Available on Friday, Saturday and Evenings 


  
Links:
Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation

American Diabetes Association™ 

American Podiatric Medical Association
 

Diabetes - How You Get Diabetes


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Foot Disorders --> Diabetes --> How You Get Diabetes

 

Diabetes Overview   How You Get Diabetes     Podiatric Physician's Role  Diabetic Related Wounds
Diabetic Foot Ulcers   Treatment of DFUs     Prevention    

 

How Do You Get Diabetes?
 
No one knows why people develop diabetes, but once diagnosed, the disease is present for life. It is a hereditary disorder, and certain genetic indicators are known to increase the risk of developing diabetes. Type 1, previously known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or juvenile-onset diabetes, afflicts five to ten percent of diagnosed cases of diabetes. This type occurs most frequently in children and adolescents, and is caused by the inability of the pancreas to produce the insulin needed for survival. Type 2, previously called noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or adult-onset diabetes, affects the other 90-95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, many of whom use oral medication or injectable insulin to control the disease. The vast majority of those people (80 percent or more) are overweight; many of them obese, as obesity itself can cause insulin resistance.

Certain Characteristics Put People at a Higher Risk for Developing Type 2 Diabetes

These include:

A family history of the disease
Obesity
Prior history of developing diabetes while pregnant
Being over the age of 40
Being a member of one of the following ethnic groups: African American, Native
   American, Latino American, Asian American, Pacific Islander

African Americans are 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes than the general population, with 25 percent of African Americans between the ages of 65 and 74 diagnosed with the disease. Hispanic Americans are almost twice as likely to develop type 2 diabetes, which affects 10.6 percent of that population group. Native Americans are at a significantly increased risk for developing diabetes, and 12.2 percent of the population suffers from the disease. In some tribes, as many as 50 percent of its members have diabetes 

Of all the risk factors, weight is the most important, with more than 80 percent
of diabetes sufferers classified as overweight.




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